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Success Stories

Single Sign On Case Study

11-Nov-2016

Single Sign On speeds up access to outside patient health records

by Dorothea Howe, M.Ed., M.A..

It’s not unusual for a patient to not fully comprehend or remember exact medical procedures and medications, especially when they’re complex.

Dr. Jay Wallin, Chief Clinical Information Officer at Central Ohio’s Mount Carmel East, posits a use case for why Single Sign On (SSO) to patient records is not only more convenient and faster than logging into separate portals, but offers diagnostic benefits of easy access to patient health records from other health systems, hospitals and facilities.

Patient doesn’t know history

Here’s a scenario: A patient presents at the Emergency Department at Mount Carmel East complaining of chest pain and tells the physician that he was at Fairfield Medical Center a week ago and had something done to his heart, Dr. Wallin explains. When the doctor asks about medications, the patient replies, “I’m taking a blue pill and a white pill.” Looking at Mount Carmel’s records on this patient, the physician doesn’t see anything about heart surgery.

“I’m not sure why he’s in my ER. I’m in a pickle,” Dr. Wallin quips. But Dr. Wallin can go directly into his drop-down menu for outside sources, click on Ohio Data Exchange, and find out what occurred at Fairfield last week. The patient has had a cardiac catheterization; the blue pill is Plavix and the white is Lisinopril. Now, the physician knows how to proceed.

Shared medical records speed up diagnosis

“From the clinician’s perspective, the record may look a little different but I’m still within my EHR,” Dr. Wallin says. “It’s magic,” he says with a laugh. He’s describing access to the patient’s Community Health Record, which contains test results, care summaries and other information from encounters at different hospitals and facilities within the CliniSync network. “If I don’t feel the need for outside information, I’m not going to go into the Community Health Record. I use it with clinical judgment,” Dr. Wallin says.

But when the Community Health Record contains pertinent information, it can lead to faster diagnosis and treatment, Wallin says.

“This has everything to do with something that happened outside of my institution, and I’m going to clinically use it and bring it forward,” he says. “I could make a more accurate diagnosis. Let’s say you had an MRI at Fairfield and it was negative for something. Well, I could cut out that diagnostic step. I could proceed to treatment faster.”

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Single Sign On Case Study

 

Improving Ohio's Health: Electronically Connecting the Community

16-Sep-2016

Electronically Connecting the Community: Making Care Plans Easier

by Dottie Howe, MA, MEd, Director of Communications

This article is part of a series devoted to hypertension and diabetes in Ohio and the prevalence of these chronic conditions. It explores the exchange of patient health information through electronic referrals in a “medical neighborhood” made up of healthcare providers and social service entities in the Central Ohio region.

Four days a month, the indigent, immigrants, refugees, the uninsured and underinsured can access diabetes and hypertension screenings as well as other health and social services at a free clinic on Morse Road in Columbus, Ohio. Physicians traditionally have had a difficult time managing chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension in this patient population.

About 1,200 patients visit the Helping Hands Health and Wellness Center annually, which uses its electronic health record (EHR) system and additional functionality provided by the CliniSync Health Information Exchange (HIE) to overcome some of the related challenges to managing indigent and uninsured patients, especially those with chronic conditions. This electronic network connects hospitals, physicians and other providers across Ohio and is managed by the nonprofit Ohio Health Information Partnership.

The clinic now has the technological capability to electronically refer patients to other partners in the Central Ohio community, referred to as a “medical neighborhood.” This concept stems from the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement where the primary care practice is the hub of a coordinated care team involving other healthcare providers. While the medical neighborhood first sought to connect primary care with specialists, the community has expanded beyond ambulatory care.

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Improving Ohio's Health: Electronically Connecting the Community
Improving Ohio's Health: New Chronic Care Management Coding

16-Sep-2016

New Chronic Care Management Coding: Proposed CMS Coding Changes for 2017

by Cathy Costello, JD, CPHIMS, Director of CliniSyncPLUS Services

This article is part of a series devoted to hypertension and diabetes in Ohio and the prevalence of these chronic conditions. It addresses changes in coding for Chronic Care Management and Transitional Care Management that CMS is proposing for the 2017 reporting year.

Let me guess: your practice looked at starting a Chronic Care Management (CCM) program. You thought it sounded like it might help with your diabetic patients and those with heart disease and COPD. You even went so far as to review all the technical requirements for starting one. But after you dug in, everyone in the office just rolled their eyes and said “Good idea; hard to execute.” Does that sum up your practice’s approach to CCM?
 
Well, look again. CMS heard about you and everyone else who hesitated to jump in to set up this brand new program and went back to the drawing board to develop a more user-friendly program.

We all know CMS is a big proponent of patient-centered care models. The cost of health care in the United States has climbed to $1 trillion. In 2014, almost 30 percent of that cost was attributed to hospital care.1 Approximately 15 percent of all hospital patients ended up being readmitted during 2014 according to CMS; so any program that can find new and creative ways to keep these hospital admission and readmission rates down receives a lot of attention by CMS.
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Improving Ohio's Health: New Chronic Care Management Coding
Improving Ohio's Health: Technology to Support Your Patients With Chronic Conditions

16-Sep-2016

Technology to Support Your Patients With Chronic Conditions - It Doesn't Have To Be Painful!

by Scott Mash, MSLIT, CPHIMS, FHIMSS
Director of Consulting Operations & HIE Outreach

This article is part of a series devoted to hypertension and diabetes in Ohio and the prevalence of these chronic conditions. It explores the functionality of EHRs and other technology to meet the requirements of the Chronic Care and Transitional Care Management Programs and how best to manage patients enrolled in these programs, especially those patients with hypertension and diabetes.

In the recent past we have produced several webinars and articles outlining the Chronic Care Management (CCM) and Transitional Care Management (TCM) programs. This article will focus on the practical application of functionality in your electronic health record (EHR) to meet the requirements of CCM/TCM and to manage your patients enrolled in these programs. Many EHR vendors have not had sufficient time to provide needed functions or accommodate the most recent regulation modifying CCM that provided increased flexibility. This article addresses the program requirements of EHRs in general, although a few vendors are mentioned by name that provide specific functions.

Adoption of a CCM/TCM program in your organization is critical for improving the health of patients with two or more chronic conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, while also providing the necessary funding to meet these goals. Studies show that approximately 68 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions while 36 percent have four or more conditions. Ensuring that these patients receive the needed care and coaching to improve wellness necessitates services outside of regular face-to-face visits which, in turn, necessitates additional funding to provide these services. Thankfully, the CCM/TCM regulation makes additional funds available, and recent modifications to the CCM program makes documentation and technical requirements easier to meet. Also, developing strong CCM/TCM programs will build key core competencies for MACRA, CPC+ and other value-based payment programs.
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Improving Ohio's Health: Technology to Support Your Patients With Chronic Conditions

 

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